Dear parents and children, 

We hope you are all keeping well.

During the time the children are off school due to the COVID-19 virus we are eager that the children continue to do some school work and follow some routine. Below you will find a suggested timetable for each day. This timetable is only a suggestion to assist you at home but do not feel obliged to follow it exactly as it is. 

In the Junior and Senior infant classrooms a lot of the learning happens through play. Play is a vital part of learning for all children and therefore it should still make up a large portion of their day. Make-believe play, messy play with water, construction play with Lego and similar toys as well as small world play with dolls, toy animals, cars and so on should all be encouraged. 

If you have the opportunity, please continue taking part in Zoom Ahead with Books using the books that you have at home. This is something the children have really been enjoying over the past couple of weeks and hopefully something you have been enjoying too.

We are aware that Gaeilge is something that people may feel nervous about in the coming weeks. Duolingo is a great app for learning Gaeilge that you and your child could complete together. Cúla4 website also has a variety of shows in Irish that the children can watch and listen to so that they are exposed to the language. 

You will find some links to suggested art activities below, however, you may have other activities you would prefer to do. This may be a good time to make St. Patrick’s Day and Easter cards for people as visiting during these times may be difficult. Feel free to do whatever kinds of art activities most interest you and your child.

We wish you the best of luck with homeschooling and hope it is a positive experience for you all. Keep safe and we look forward to seeing you all when we return to school.

Evelyn and Louise 

 

Suggested Daily Timetable

  • Story Time – 20 minutes
  • Writing – 20 minutes
  • Busy Break (GoNoodle website or Joe Wicks Kids on Youtube) – 10 minutes

Break, healthy snack and play

  • Numeracy Activities – 20 minutes
  • Numeracy Song/Rhyme 5/10 minutes
  • Number formation practice 5/10 minutes 
  • Busy Break (Dancing, Twister, outdoor play, etc) – 15 minutes

Break, healthy snack and play

  • Phonics and Tricky Words practice and games – 15 minutes
  • Gaeilge (Duolingo app or Cúla4 website) -15/20 minutes
  • Art Activity – 20/30 minutes

 

Ideas for Art Activities

Click here for Literacy Activities at Home for Junior & Senior Infants

Click here for Junior Infants Busy at Maths Home School Links for Parents

Click here for Senior Infants Busy at Maths Home School Links for Parents

If possible, try to complete some of the following science activities with your child. Science is a subject that fascinates many children and a great opportunity to promote oral language. Some of these activities may no be possible or practical but have a look and see what you think. https://www.sfi.ie/engagement/discover-primary-science-and-maths/activities-search/index.xml

MORE IDEAS FOR NUMERACY ACTIVITIES:

Rhythm Counting: Use actions such as clapping,pat-a-cake, tapping, hopping and jumping to set the pace for counting up and down to 10 or 20. Choose different numbers to stop and start at, for example, ‘We’re going to start at 4 and count up to 10’, or ‘We’re going to start at 10 and count down to 2’. 

Simon Says: Simon Says is a great way to promote listening and comprehension skills as well as to practice number work and directional language. Give instructions like: 5 jumping Jacks, clap your hands 3 times, hop on one foot 4 times. Also include language such as over, under, beside, in, on and between in your instructions. 
Find and Press: Using a calculator (phone calculator is fine) call out a number and get your child to identify and press this number. To encourage concentration and listening you could call out two or three numbers and your child must press them in the same order. You could also try simple addition sums such as ‘Press the answer to two and one more makes’. 
Make A One-More-Than Set: Give children about 5 items which could be used as counters (any 5 of the same item, such as spoons, pieces of pasta, Lego bricks, whatever). You make a set with a maximum of 3 of these items in it and together with your child count how many items are in that set. Then, using the counters they have, ask your child to make a set that has one-more-than the set you made. For example, if you made a set of three, they would have to make a set of four. Encourage them to count aloud as they do this. 
Cover That Number: You will need a dice. You will also need two sets of 10 counters (one set of 10 pasta pieces and one set of 10 Lego bricks for example). Make a simple game board using a sheet of paper. Around the edges of the page draw boxes so that it becomes a rectangular track. In each square write one number (numbers 1 – 6 only). They do not need to be in order. On your turn roll the dice, count the dots and cover a square with that number using one of your markers. The first person to cover 10 squares is the winner. 
Board Games: If you have board games like Snakes and Ladders or Ludo they are a great way to promote counting and concentration as well as turn taking. Children have to not only count the number of dots on the dice but also count on this number of spaces on the board. 
Playdough: Playdough can be used to help children with number formation. There are some numbers that children frequently write backwards, like 2 and 3. Using playdough to form the numbers is a fun way to practice making them the right way around. You can make a set of between 1 and 5 objects, ask your child to count the number of objects in the set and make the answer using playdough. If you don’t have any playdough at home there are lots of recipes online for making it which would be a fun activity to do with your child! 
Rice Krispie Buns: Baking is a great opportunity to practice a bit of counting. Making something like Rice Krispie buns your child can count by counting out the bun cases, counting how many squares of chocolate go in, counting how many spoons of Rice Krispies are added and so on. It is also a good way to use the language beside, in, on, into, etc. 

NUMERACY SONGS/POEMS/RHYMES:

One, Two, Three, Four, Five

One, two, three, four, five,
Once I caught a fish alive,
Six, seven, eight, nine, ten,
Then I let it go again.
Why did you let it go?
Because it bit my finger so.
Which finger did it bite?
This little finger on my right. 
Five Little Candles
Five little candles in the night. 
Five little candles, burning bright. 
Along came the wind…Shoooooo….all is quiet, 
Four little candles burning in the night.
Four little candles in the night. 
Four little candles, burning bright. 
Along came the wind…Shoooooo….all is quiet, 
Three little candles burning in the night. 
Three little candles in the night…….
Two little candles in the night …….
One little candle in the night…….
Five Brown Cookies
Five brown cookies in the baker’s shop, 
Round and fat with chocolate on top, 
Along came (your child’s name) with a euro one day, 
Bought a brown cookie and took it away! 
Four brown cookies in the baker’s shop, 
Round and fat with chocolate on top, 
Along came ______ with a euro one day, 
Bought a brown cookie and took it away! 
Three brown cookies in the baker’s shop…….
Two brown cookies in the baker’s shop…..
One brown cookie in the baker’s shop…..
Five Little Monkeys 
Five little monkeys jumping on the bed, 
One fell off and bumped his head, 
Mammy called the doctor and the doctor said 
“No more monkeys jumping on the bed!”   
Four little monkeys jumping on the bed….
Three little monkeys jumping on the bed…..
Two little monkeys jumping on the bed…..
One little monkey jumping on the bed…..

Numeracy Ideas

Rhythm Counting: Use actions such as clapping,pat-a-cake, tapping, hopping and jumping to set the pace for counting up and down to 10 or 20. Choose different numbers to stop and start at, for example, 'We're going to start at 4 and count up to 10', or 'We're going to start at 10 and count down to 2'. Simon Says: Simon Says is a great way to promote listening and comprehension skills as well as to practice number work and directional language. Give instructions like: 5 jumping Jacks, clap your hands 3 times, hop on one foot 4 times. Also include language such as over, under, beside, in, on and between in your instructions. Find and Press: Using a calculator (phone calculator is fine) call out a number and get your child to identify and press this number. To encourage concentration and listening you could call out two or three numbers and your child must press them in the same order. You could also try simple addition sums such as 'Press the answer to two and one more makes'. Make A One-More-Than Set: Give children about 5 items which could be used as counters (any 5 of the same item, such as spoons, pieces of pasta, Lego bricks, whatever). You make a set with a maximum of 3 of these items in it and together with your child count how many items are in that set. Then, using the counters they have, ask your child to make a set that has one-more-than the set you made. For example, if you made a set of three, they would have to make a set of four. Encourage them to count aloud as they do this. Cover That Number: You will need a dice. You will also need two sets of 10 counters (one set of 10 pasta pieces and one set of 10 Lego bricks for example). Make a simple game board using a sheet of paper. Around the edges of the page draw boxes so that it becomes a rectangular track. In each square write one number (numbers 1 - 6 only). They do not need to be in order. On your turn roll the dice, count the dots and cover a square with that number using one of your markers. The first person to cover 10 squares is the winner. Board Games: If you have board games like Snakes and Ladders or Ludo they are a great way to promote counting and concentration as well as turn taking. Children have to not only count the number of dots on the dice but also count on this number of spaces on the board. Playdough: Playdough can be used to help children with number formation. There are some numbers that children frequently write backwards, like 2 and 3. Using playdough to form the numbers is a fun way to practice making them the right way around. You can make a set of between 1 and 5 objects, ask your child to count the number of objects in the set and make the answer using playdough. If you don't have any playdough at home there are lots of recipes online for making it which would be a fun activity to do with your child! Rice Krispie Buns: Baking is a great opportunity to practice a bit of counting. Making something like Rice Krispie buns your child can count by counting out the bun cases, counting how many squares of chocolate go in, counting how many spoons of Rice Krispies are added and so on. It is also a good way to use the language beside, in, on, into, etc.